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Today's Forex News

USD/CAD moves away from over two-month low, climbs beyond mid-1.3500s amid bearish Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair builds on the previous day's recovery move from the 1.3480 region, or its lowest level since September 29 and gains positive traction for the second successive day on Tuesday. The momentum lifts spot prices to a three-day top, beyond mid-1.3500s during the Asian session and is sponsored by bearish Crude Oil prices.FX Street2023-12-05

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil prices

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil pricesFX Street2023-12-05

USD/CAD moves away from over two-month low, climbs beyond mid-1.3500s amid bearish Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair builds on the previous day's recovery move from the 1.3480 region, or its lowest level since September 29 and gains positive traction for the second successive day on Tuesday. The momentum lifts spot prices to a three-day top, beyond mid-1.3500s during the Asian session and is sponsored by bearish Crude Oil prices.FX Street2023-12-05

EUR/USD, GBP/USD, USD/CAD, USD/JPY Forecasts – U.S. Dollar Tests New Highs As Rebound Continues

The disappointing JOLTs Job Openings report did not put pressure on the American currency.FXEmpire2023-12-05

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil prices

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil pricesFX Street2023-12-05

USD/CAD moves away from over two-month low, climbs beyond mid-1.3500s amid bearish Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair builds on the previous day's recovery move from the 1.3480 region, or its lowest level since September 29 and gains positive traction for the second successive day on Tuesday. The momentum lifts spot prices to a three-day top, beyond mid-1.3500s during the Asian session and is sponsored by bearish Crude Oil prices.FX Street2023-12-05

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The United States Dollar: A Historical Perspective

The United States dollar, symbolized as $ and often referred to as the greenback, has a rich and storied history that is intertwined with the development and growth of the United States itself. The dollar is not just a piece of paper or a number in a bank account; it is a symbol of the economic power and global influence of the United States.

Colonial Beginnings

The history of the U.S. dollar can be traced back to the early colonial period. The colonies, lacking a standard form of currency, used a variety of mediums for trade, including wampum, tobacco, and foreign coins. The British government, however, prohibited the colonies from minting their own coins, leading to a chronic shortage of currency.

In response to this shortage, the Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies in 1690. Other colonies soon followed suit. These early forms of paper money were essentially promissory notes or bills of credit. They were not backed by gold or silver but were instead backed by the promise of future tax revenues.

The Birth of the Dollar

The U.S. dollar as we know it today was first proposed by Robert Morris, a Pennsylvania financier who was appointed as Superintendent of Finance in 1781. Morris proposed the creation of a national currency, with the dollar as its basic unit. His proposal was based on the Spanish milled dollar, a silver coin that was widely used in the colonies.

The U.S. dollar was officially adopted by the Congress of the Confederation with the passage of the Coinage Act of 1792. This act established the U.S. Mint and defined the dollar in terms of silver: a dollar was to contain 371.25 grains of pure silver. The act also established a gold-to-silver ratio of 15:1, meaning that one ounce of gold was worth 15 ounces of silver.

The Gold Standard

The U.S. remained on a bimetallic standard until 1873, when the Fourth Coinage Act was passed. This act, also known as the Gold Standard Act, effectively put the U.S. on a de facto gold standard by eliminating silver as a standard of value. The act was controversial and led to the so-called "Free Silver" movement, which advocated for the free coinage of silver.

The U.S. officially adopted the gold standard with the passage of the Gold Standard Act of 1900. This act defined the dollar in terms of gold: a dollar was equivalent to 23.22 grains of gold, or roughly 1/20th of an ounce.

The Federal Reserve and Fiat Currency

The creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913 marked a significant shift in U.S. monetary policy. The Federal Reserve was given the power to issue Federal Reserve Notes, which became the only type of paper money issued in the U.S.

The U.S. abandoned the gold standard during the Great Depression. In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order prohibiting the private ownership of gold. The Gold Reserve Act of 1934 confirmed this policy and devalued the dollar to 1/35th of an ounce of gold.

The final break with gold came in 1971, when President Richard Nixon ended the convertibility of the dollar into gold. This marked the beginning of the era of fiat money, in which the dollar is not backed by any physical commodity but is instead backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.

The Dollar in the Global Economy

After World War II, the Bretton Woods agreement established the U.S. dollar as the world's reserve currency. Under this system, other countries pegged their currencies to the dollar, whichwas in turn pegged to gold. This system lasted until 1971, when the U.S. abandoned the gold standard.

Since then, the U.S. dollar has remained the dominant global reserve currency, despite occasional challenges. The dollar's status as the world's reserve currency gives the U.S. significant economic advantages, including the ability to borrow at lower costs and to have significant influence over global economic affairs.

The Digital Age

In the digital age, the U.S. dollar has evolved once again. Today, most dollars exist not as physical currency but as digital entries in electronic accounts. The rise of digital payment systems, online banking, and cryptocurrencies represent new frontiers for the U.S. dollar.

Conclusion

The history of the U.S. dollar is a testament to the economic development and global influence of the United States. From its colonial beginnings to its current status as the world's dominant reserve currency, the dollar has been a central player in global economic affairs. As we move further into the digital age, the dollar will undoubtedly continue to evolve, reflecting the changing nature of money and value in our society.

The Euro: A Historical Perspective

The Euro, symbolized as EUR (€), is the official currency of the Eurozone, a monetary union consisting of 19 of the 27 member states of the European Union (EU). The history of the Euro is a fascinating narrative that mirrors the economic, political, and social evolution of the European continent.

The idea of a single European currency dates back to the post-World War II period, when European leaders sought to promote economic integration as a way to prevent future wars. However, it wasn't until the 1990s that the idea began to take shape.

The Maastricht Treaty, signed in 1992, laid the groundwork for the Euro. It set out the criteria for Eurozone membership, including price and exchange rate stability and sound public finances. The treaty also established the European Central Bank (ECB) and the European System of Central Banks.

The Euro was officially launched on January 1, 1999, when 11 EU member states irrevocably locked their exchange rates and handed over their monetary policy to the ECB. However, the Euro was initially a "virtual" currency used only for electronic payments and accounting purposes, while national currencies continued to circulate in physical form.

Euro banknotes and coins were introduced on January 1, 2002, and national currencies were gradually phased out. The introduction of the Euro banknotes and coins was one of the largest monetary changes in history, affecting hundreds of millions of people.

The Eurozone has since expanded to include 19 countries. The Euro has become the second most traded currency in the world after the U.S. Dollar and the second largest reserve currency.

The Euro has faced significant challenges since its inception. The global financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent Eurozone debt crisis exposed structural weaknesses in the Eurozone's architecture. These crises led to high unemployment and recession in several Eurozone countries and required international bailouts for Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain, and Cyprus.

In response to the crisis, Eurozone leaders implemented a series of reforms, including stricter fiscal rules, a banking union, and new mechanisms for financial stability. The ECB also played a crucial role in stabilizing the Euro through unconventional monetary policies, including negative interest rates and large-scale asset purchases.

Despite these challenges, the Euro has contributed to economic stability in the Eurozone by eliminating exchange rate fluctuations and promoting economic integration. It has also facilitated travel and trade among Eurozone countries and played a significant role in shaping the global monetary system.

In conclusion, the history of the Euro reflects the broader economic and political history of Europe. From its origins in the aftermath of World War II to its role in the modern European economy, the Euro embodies the economic transformations that have shaped Europe. As Europe continues to evolve, the Euro will undoubtedly continue to play a crucial role in the continent's economic narrative. The future of the Euro will be shaped by how effectively the Eurozone navigates its economic challenges and capitalizes on its opportunities. As we look to the future, the Euro, like Europe itself, stands at the threshold of potential and promise.