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Today's Forex News

USD/CAD sticks to intraday gains around 1.3525 amid weaker Crude Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair is seen building on last week's rebound from the 1.3440 support zone and gaining some positive traction for the second successive day on Monday. Spot prices stick to modest intraday gains through the first half of the European session and currently trade around the 1.3525 region amid weaker Crude Oil prices.FX Street2024-02-26

USD/CAD Price Analysis: Improves to near 1.3520 following February's high

USD/CAD moves higher for the second consecutive day, inching higher to near 1.3520 during the European session on Monday. The pair could meet the key barrier at the major level of 1.3550 following February's high at 1.3586.FX Street2024-02-26

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The Euro: A Historical Perspective

The Euro, symbolized as EUR (€), is the official currency of the Eurozone, a monetary union consisting of 19 of the 27 member states of the European Union (EU). The history of the Euro is a fascinating narrative that mirrors the economic, political, and social evolution of the European continent.

The idea of a single European currency dates back to the post-World War II period, when European leaders sought to promote economic integration as a way to prevent future wars. However, it wasn't until the 1990s that the idea began to take shape.

The Maastricht Treaty, signed in 1992, laid the groundwork for the Euro. It set out the criteria for Eurozone membership, including price and exchange rate stability and sound public finances. The treaty also established the European Central Bank (ECB) and the European System of Central Banks.

The Euro was officially launched on January 1, 1999, when 11 EU member states irrevocably locked their exchange rates and handed over their monetary policy to the ECB. However, the Euro was initially a "virtual" currency used only for electronic payments and accounting purposes, while national currencies continued to circulate in physical form.

Euro banknotes and coins were introduced on January 1, 2002, and national currencies were gradually phased out. The introduction of the Euro banknotes and coins was one of the largest monetary changes in history, affecting hundreds of millions of people.

The Eurozone has since expanded to include 19 countries. The Euro has become the second most traded currency in the world after the U.S. Dollar and the second largest reserve currency.

The Euro has faced significant challenges since its inception. The global financial crisis of 2008 and the subsequent Eurozone debt crisis exposed structural weaknesses in the Eurozone's architecture. These crises led to high unemployment and recession in several Eurozone countries and required international bailouts for Greece, Ireland, Portugal, Spain, and Cyprus.

In response to the crisis, Eurozone leaders implemented a series of reforms, including stricter fiscal rules, a banking union, and new mechanisms for financial stability. The ECB also played a crucial role in stabilizing the Euro through unconventional monetary policies, including negative interest rates and large-scale asset purchases.

Despite these challenges, the Euro has contributed to economic stability in the Eurozone by eliminating exchange rate fluctuations and promoting economic integration. It has also facilitated travel and trade among Eurozone countries and played a significant role in shaping the global monetary system.

In conclusion, the history of the Euro reflects the broader economic and political history of Europe. From its origins in the aftermath of World War II to its role in the modern European economy, the Euro embodies the economic transformations that have shaped Europe. As Europe continues to evolve, the Euro will undoubtedly continue to play a crucial role in the continent's economic narrative. The future of the Euro will be shaped by how effectively the Eurozone navigates its economic challenges and capitalizes on its opportunities. As we look to the future, the Euro, like Europe itself, stands at the threshold of potential and promise.

Title: The Chinese Yuan: A Historical Overview

The Chinese Yuan, symbolized as CNY (¥), is the official currency of the People's Republic of China. Its history is deeply intertwined with the economic, political, and social evolution of China, one of the world's oldest civilizations and its second-largest economy.

The term "Yuan" dates back to the Mongol-led Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368), where it was used to refer to a round coin. However, the modern concept of the Chinese Yuan as a unit of currency began in the late 19th century.

During the late Qing Dynasty, China's traditional system of coinage, based on silver taels and copper-alloy cash coins, was increasingly challenged by the influx of foreign currencies brought by international trade. In response, the Qing government established the Shanghai Mint in 1896 and began issuing silver coins denominated in yuan, marking the first use of the yuan as a unit of account.

The 1911 revolution ended the Qing Dynasty and led to the establishment of the Republic of China. The new government aimed to modernize China's currency system and began issuing paper currency denominated in yuan. However, political instability led to a proliferation of different currencies issued by various regional banks and warlords.

The establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949 marked a turning point in the history of the Chinese Yuan. The new communist government quickly moved to unify the currency system and established the People's Bank of China (PBOC) as the country's central bank. The PBOC began issuing a new currency, known as Renminbi (People's Currency), with the yuan as its primary unit.

The early years of the People's Republic were marked by economic instability and inflation, leading to several currency reforms. In 1955, a currency reform replaced the old yuan at a rate of one new yuan to 10,000 old yuan.

The Chinese economy was largely closed to the outside world until the economic reforms initiated by Deng Xiaoping in the late 1970s. These reforms marked the beginning of China's transformation into a market economy and led to significant changes in the management of the Chinese Yuan.

In 1994, a major reform unified the official and market exchange rates of the yuan, effectively devaluing the official rate and making the yuan more convertible under the current account. However, the yuan remained non-convertible under the capital account, with the government maintaining strict controls over capital flows.

The 21st century has seen the Chinese Yuan play an increasingly important role in the global economy, reflecting China's rising economic power. In 2005, China moved away from a fixed exchange rate system pegged to the U.S. dollar and adopted a managed float system based on market supply and demand with reference to a basket of currencies.

In 2010, China further loosened its capital controls, allowing greater use of the yuan in international trade and investment. This was part of a broader strategy to internationalize the yuan and reduce China's reliance on the U.S. dollar.

In 2016, the International Monetary Fund included the Chinese Yuan in its Special Drawing Rights basket, marking a significant milestone in the yuan's internationalization process.

Despite these reforms, the Chinese Yuan remains subject to capital controls, and its exchange rate is closely managed by the PBOC. This has led to tensions with trading partners, particularly the United States, which has accused China of manipulating its currency to gain a trade advantage.

In conclusion, the history of the Chinese Yuan reflects the broader economic and political history of China. From its origins in the late Qing Dynasty to its emerging role as a global currency, the Chinese Yuan embodies the economic transformations that have shaped modern China. As China continues to evolve, the Chinese Yuanwill undoubtedly continue to play a crucial role in the global economy, reflecting the strengths and challenges of this dynamic and rapidly changing nation.