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Today's Forex News

Market Analysis: GBP/USD Struggles While USD/CAD Aims Higher

On the hourly chart of GBP/USD at FXOpen, the pair started a fresh decline from the 1.2700 zone. The British Pound traded below the 1.2650 support to move into further a bearish zone against the US Dollar, as mentioned in the previous analysis.Action Forex2024-03-01

EUR/USD, GBP/USD, USD/CAD, USD/JPY Forecasts – U.S. Dollar Pulls Back As ISM Manufacturing PMI Misses Expectations

U.S. Dollar Index pulled back below the 104.00 level as traders reacted to economic reports.FXEmpire2024-03-01

USD/CAD: The balance of risks is tilted to the downside for the Loonie next week – ING

There is a risk that the BoC will turn a notch more dovish at the March meeting. Thus, the Canadian Dollar (CAD) could come under pressure in the next week, economists at ING say.FX Street2024-03-01

USD/CAD: Losses need to extend below 1.3540 to put any sort of technical pressure – Scotiabank

USD/CAD trades little changed on the session. Economists at Scotiabank analyze the pair's outlook.FX Street2024-03-01

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The Swiss Franc: A Historical Perspective

The Swiss Franc, often symbolized as CHF (Confoederatio Helvetica Franc), is the official currency of Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Its history is a fascinating journey that reflects the economic and political evolution of Switzerland, a country renowned for its stability and neutrality.

The Swiss Franc's story begins in the early 19th century. Before 1798, Switzerland was a loose confederation of cantons, each issuing its own currency. This system was chaotic, with over 860 different coins in circulation. The French invasion in 1798 brought about the Helvetic Republic, which attempted to introduce a standardized currency, the Swiss Franc, modeled after the French Franc. However, this was met with resistance, and the old system of cantonal currencies returned after the collapse of the Helvetic Republic in 1803.

The real turning point came in 1848 when the Swiss Federal Constitution came into effect, centralizing many powers previously held by the cantons, including the right to issue money. The Swiss Federal Assembly passed the Federal Coinage Act in 1850, establishing the Swiss Franc as the single official currency of Switzerland. The Swiss Franc was pegged to the French Franc at par, reflecting the close economic ties between the two countries.

The Swiss National Bank (SNB) was established in 1907, taking over the issuance of banknotes from private banks. The SNB's mandate was to ensure the stability of the Swiss Franc, a task it has performed admirably over the years. The Swiss Franc was initially on a gold standard, with 1 Franc equal to 0.290322 grams of gold. However, the gold standard was suspended during World War I, and Switzerland moved to a system of managed currency.

During the Bretton Woods era (1944-1971), the Swiss Franc was pegged to the U.S. Dollar, with a value of 4.375 Francs to the Dollar. However, Switzerland was not a signatory to the Bretton Woods Agreement, allowing it to avoid the currency instability that affected many other countries when the system collapsed in 1971.

Since the collapse of Bretton Woods, the Swiss Franc has been a free-floating currency. The SNB has occasionally intervened in the currency markets to prevent the Franc from appreciating too much, as Switzerland's economy is heavily dependent on exports. The Swiss Franc is often seen as a "safe haven" currency, attracting investors during times of global economic uncertainty.

In 1980, Switzerland began issuing coins made of cupronickel instead of silver, reflecting the rising cost of silver. The designs on Swiss coins have remained remarkably consistent since 1879, featuring the Swiss cross and the phrase "Confoederatio Helvetica", the Latin name for the Swiss Confederation.

In 2000, the SNB introduced a new series of banknotes, each featuring a famous Swiss personality. These were replaced in 2016 by the current series, which features abstract designs representing various aspects of Swiss society.

The Swiss Franc has been remarkably stable over its history, reflecting the stability of the Swiss economy and political system. This stability, combined with Switzerland's strong tradition of banking secrecy, has made the Swiss Franc a popular currency for international banking.

In conclusion, the history of the Swiss Franc is a testament to Switzerland's economic resilience and political stability. From its origins in the turbulent 19th century to its status as a "safe haven" currency in the 21st, the Swiss Franc has played a crucial role in Switzerland's economic success. As we look to the future, the Swiss Franc will undoubtedly continue to reflect the strengths and challenges of this unique Alpine nation.

The United States Dollar: A Historical Perspective

The United States dollar, symbolized as $ and often referred to as the greenback, has a rich and storied history that is intertwined with the development and growth of the United States itself. The dollar is not just a piece of paper or a number in a bank account; it is a symbol of the economic power and global influence of the United States.

Colonial Beginnings

The history of the U.S. dollar can be traced back to the early colonial period. The colonies, lacking a standard form of currency, used a variety of mediums for trade, including wampum, tobacco, and foreign coins. The British government, however, prohibited the colonies from minting their own coins, leading to a chronic shortage of currency.

In response to this shortage, the Massachusetts Bay Colony issued the first paper money in the colonies in 1690. Other colonies soon followed suit. These early forms of paper money were essentially promissory notes or bills of credit. They were not backed by gold or silver but were instead backed by the promise of future tax revenues.

The Birth of the Dollar

The U.S. dollar as we know it today was first proposed by Robert Morris, a Pennsylvania financier who was appointed as Superintendent of Finance in 1781. Morris proposed the creation of a national currency, with the dollar as its basic unit. His proposal was based on the Spanish milled dollar, a silver coin that was widely used in the colonies.

The U.S. dollar was officially adopted by the Congress of the Confederation with the passage of the Coinage Act of 1792. This act established the U.S. Mint and defined the dollar in terms of silver: a dollar was to contain 371.25 grains of pure silver. The act also established a gold-to-silver ratio of 15:1, meaning that one ounce of gold was worth 15 ounces of silver.

The Gold Standard

The U.S. remained on a bimetallic standard until 1873, when the Fourth Coinage Act was passed. This act, also known as the Gold Standard Act, effectively put the U.S. on a de facto gold standard by eliminating silver as a standard of value. The act was controversial and led to the so-called "Free Silver" movement, which advocated for the free coinage of silver.

The U.S. officially adopted the gold standard with the passage of the Gold Standard Act of 1900. This act defined the dollar in terms of gold: a dollar was equivalent to 23.22 grains of gold, or roughly 1/20th of an ounce.

The Federal Reserve and Fiat Currency

The creation of the Federal Reserve in 1913 marked a significant shift in U.S. monetary policy. The Federal Reserve was given the power to issue Federal Reserve Notes, which became the only type of paper money issued in the U.S.

The U.S. abandoned the gold standard during the Great Depression. In 1933, President Franklin D. Roosevelt issued an executive order prohibiting the private ownership of gold. The Gold Reserve Act of 1934 confirmed this policy and devalued the dollar to 1/35th of an ounce of gold.

The final break with gold came in 1971, when President Richard Nixon ended the convertibility of the dollar into gold. This marked the beginning of the era of fiat money, in which the dollar is not backed by any physical commodity but is instead backed by the full faith and credit of the U.S. government.

The Dollar in the Global Economy

After World War II, the Bretton Woods agreement established the U.S. dollar as the world's reserve currency. Under this system, other countries pegged their currencies to the dollar, whichwas in turn pegged to gold. This system lasted until 1971, when the U.S. abandoned the gold standard.

Since then, the U.S. dollar has remained the dominant global reserve currency, despite occasional challenges. The dollar's status as the world's reserve currency gives the U.S. significant economic advantages, including the ability to borrow at lower costs and to have significant influence over global economic affairs.

The Digital Age

In the digital age, the U.S. dollar has evolved once again. Today, most dollars exist not as physical currency but as digital entries in electronic accounts. The rise of digital payment systems, online banking, and cryptocurrencies represent new frontiers for the U.S. dollar.

Conclusion

The history of the U.S. dollar is a testament to the economic development and global influence of the United States. From its colonial beginnings to its current status as the world's dominant reserve currency, the dollar has been a central player in global economic affairs. As we move further into the digital age, the dollar will undoubtedly continue to evolve, reflecting the changing nature of money and value in our society.