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Today's Forex News

USD/CAD retreats from multi-month top, eyes mid-1.3600s ahead of Canadian jobs data

The USD/CAD pair meets with some supply during the Asian session on Friday and erodes a part of the previous day's strong gains to 1.3700 neighbourhood, or its highest level since March 28. Spot prices currently trade around the 1.3670-1.3665 region, down 0.10% for the day, though the fundamental backdrop warrants some caution for aggressive bearish traders and positioning for any meaningful corrective slide.FX Street2023-09-08

USD/CAD Price Analysis: Defends 1.3650 resistance-turned-support ahead of Canadian jobs data

The USD/CAD pair comes under some selling pressure on Friday and reverses a part of the previous day's positive move to the 1.3700 neighbourhood, or its highest level since late March. Spot prices, however, manage to rebound a few pips from the daily low and trade around the 1.3665-1.3670 area during the first half of the European session, down less than 0.15% for the day.FX Street2023-09-08

USD/CAD retreats from multi-month top, eyes mid-1.3600s ahead of Canadian jobs data

The USD/CAD pair meets with some supply during the Asian session on Friday and erodes a part of the previous day's strong gains to 1.3700 neighbourhood, or its highest level since March 28. Spot prices currently trade around the 1.3670-1.3665 region, down 0.10% for the day, though the fundamental backdrop warrants some caution for aggressive bearish traders and positioning for any meaningful corrective slide.FX Street2023-09-08

Daily Forex News and Watchlist: GBP/CAD

Canada is printing its labor market numbers today! How do you think it will affect GBP/CAD's potential short-term reversal pattern?Babypips2023-09-08

EUR/USD, GBP/USD, USD/CAD, USD/JPY Forecasts – U.S. Dollar Is Mostly Flat Ahead Of The Weekend

Trading is calm in the absence of major catalysts.FXEmpire2023-09-08

USD/CAD: A Hot Canadian Employment/Wage Report Sends the Loonie Higher

Canada's economy isn't quite ready to cool. The latest Canadian employment report showed hiring bounced back in August, doubling expectations.Action Forex2023-09-08

Additional News:

USD/CAD Dips on Solid Canadian Data but Broader Outlook Tied to US Inflation

USD/CAD slides in reaction to strong employment growth in Canada, yet the broader direction of the pair could be more closely tied to the forthcoming U.S. inflation report next week.DailyFX2023-09-08

USD/CAD cracks on upbeat Canadian labor market data

The USD/CAD pair faces an intense sell-off as Statistics Canada has reported better-than-anticipated labor market data. The Canadian labor market witnessed fresh additions of 39.9K payrolls in August, more than doubling the expectations of 15K.FX Street2023-09-08

USD/CAD Price Analysis: Defends 1.3650 resistance-turned-support ahead of Canadian jobs data

The USD/CAD pair comes under some selling pressure on Friday and reverses a part of the previous day's positive move to the 1.3700 neighbourhood, or its highest level since late March. Spot prices, however, manage to rebound a few pips from the daily low and trade around the 1.3665-1.3670 area during the first half of the European session, down less than 0.15% for the day.FX Street2023-09-08

USD/CAD retreats from multi-month top, eyes mid-1.3600s ahead of Canadian jobs data

The USD/CAD pair meets with some supply during the Asian session on Friday and erodes a part of the previous day's strong gains to 1.3700 neighbourhood, or its highest level since March 28. Spot prices currently trade around the 1.3670-1.3665 region, down 0.10% for the day, though the fundamental backdrop warrants some caution for aggressive bearish traders and positioning for any meaningful corrective slide.FX Street2023-09-08

Daily Forex News and Watchlist: GBP/CAD

Canada is printing its labor market numbers today! How do you think it will affect GBP/CAD's potential short-term reversal pattern?Babypips2023-09-08

USD/CAD: A Hot Canadian Employment/Wage Report Sends the Loonie Higher

Canada's economy isn't quite ready to cool. The latest Canadian employment report showed hiring bounced back in August, doubling expectations.Action Forex2023-09-08

USD/CAD Dips on Solid Canadian Data but Broader Outlook Tied to US Inflation

USD/CAD slides in reaction to strong employment growth in Canada, yet the broader direction of the pair could be more closely tied to the forthcoming U.S. inflation report next week.DailyFX2023-09-08

USD/CAD cracks on upbeat Canadian labor market data

The USD/CAD pair faces an intense sell-off as Statistics Canada has reported better-than-anticipated labor market data. The Canadian labor market witnessed fresh additions of 39.9K payrolls in August, more than doubling the expectations of 15K.FX Street2023-09-08

USD/CAD Price Analysis: Defends 1.3650 resistance-turned-support ahead of Canadian jobs data

The USD/CAD pair comes under some selling pressure on Friday and reverses a part of the previous day's positive move to the 1.3700 neighbourhood, or its highest level since late March. Spot prices, however, manage to rebound a few pips from the daily low and trade around the 1.3665-1.3670 area during the first half of the European session, down less than 0.15% for the day.FX Street2023-09-08

USD/CAD retreats from multi-month top, eyes mid-1.3600s ahead of Canadian jobs data

The USD/CAD pair meets with some supply during the Asian session on Friday and erodes a part of the previous day's strong gains to 1.3700 neighbourhood, or its highest level since March 28. Spot prices currently trade around the 1.3670-1.3665 region, down 0.10% for the day, though the fundamental backdrop warrants some caution for aggressive bearish traders and positioning for any meaningful corrective slide.FX Street2023-09-08

Daily Forex News and Watchlist: GBP/CAD

Canada is printing its labor market numbers today! How do you think it will affect GBP/CAD's potential short-term reversal pattern?Babypips2023-09-08

The Evolution of the Japanese Yen: A Historical Perspective

The Japanese yen, symbolized as JPY or ¥, is the official currency of Japan and a significant player in the global economy. Its history is a fascinating tale of economic development, strategic decision-making, and national identity. This article delves into the origins, development, and significant milestones of the Japanese yen.

The yen was introduced in 1871, during the Meiji era, as part of the modernization drive of the Japanese economy. Before this, Japan had a complex system of currency, with a variety of feudal domains issuing their own coins. The New Currency Act aimed to simplify and centralize this system, replacing it with a decimal-based currency, the yen. The yen was divided into 100 sen and 1000 rin, mirroring the European currency systems of the time.

The early yen was a gold standard currency, pegged to gold at a rate similar to that of the US dollar or the British pound. This was a strategic move to facilitate trade and integration with the global economy. However, the high value of the yen led to outflows of gold from Japan, causing economic instability.

In response to this, Japan abandoned the gold standard in 1931, following the trend set by the UK and the US during the Great Depression. The yen was devalued, and exchange controls were introduced to stabilize the economy. During World War II, the yen was further devalued, and the economy suffered from hyperinflation.

Post-war, the yen was pegged to the US dollar under the Bretton Woods system at a rate of 360 yen to 1 dollar. This fixed exchange rate system helped stabilize the Japanese economy and facilitated the country's post-war recovery and rapid economic growth. However, the Bretton Woods system collapsed in 1971, and the yen became a free-floating currency in 1973. This allowed the yen's value to be determined by the foreign exchange market, reflecting Japan's economic conditions more accurately.

The 1980s saw the yen strengthen significantly against the US dollar, a period known as the 'Endaka' or high-yen era. This was due to Japan's booming economy and large trade surpluses. However, the bubble burst in the early 1990s, leading to a period of economic stagnation known as the 'Lost Decade'.

In terms of physical currency, the yen has seen several changes. Coins come in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 500 yen. The designs on these coins, featuring iconic symbols like the chrysanthemum and sakura blossoms, reflect Japan's rich cultural heritage. Banknotes come in denominations of 1000, 5000, and 10,000 yen, with a new series introduced in 2019 featuring prominent Japanese figures and cultural symbols.

The yen has also been influenced by significant economic events, such as the Asian Financial Crisis of 1997 and the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. These crises led to fluctuations in the value of the yen and prompted policy responses from the Bank of Japan.

Today, the Japanese yen is one of the most traded currencies in the world, reflecting Japan's significant role in the global economy. It serves not only as a medium of exchange within Japan but also as a safe-haven currency in times of global economic uncertainty.

In conclusion, the history of the Japanese yen is a testament to Japan's economic resilience and strategic adaptability. From its early days under the gold standard to its current status as a free-floating currency, the yen has continually evolved to meet the nation's needs. As we look to the future, it will undoubtedly continue to adapt and serve as a key player in the

The Canadian Dollar: A Historical Journey

The Canadian dollar, symbolized as CAD or C$, is the official currency of Canada. Its history is a fascinating tale of economic development, political decisions, and global influences. The journey of the Canadian dollar reflects the growth and evolution of Canada as a nation.

Early Currency in Canada

Before the introduction of the Canadian dollar, the region had a diverse array of currencies in circulation. French colonists used French coins, British colonists used British pounds, and Spanish dollars were also widely circulated. In addition, indigenous peoples used wampum, a form of currency made from shell beads.

In the early 19th century, the British pound was the official currency of British North America. However, the Spanish dollar was the most widely used currency in everyday transactions due to its wide circulation in the Americas.

The Birth of the Canadian Dollar

The idea of a unified currency for Canada was first proposed in the 1840s. The Province of Canada, consisting of modern-day Ontario and Quebec, passed the Currency Act in 1841, which aimed to replace the diverse currencies in circulation with a single, unified currency.

The Canadian dollar was officially introduced in 1858, replacing the British pound. The new currency was based on the decimal system, making it easier to calculate than the pound system. The Canadian dollar was pegged to the US dollar at par, reflecting the close economic ties between the two countries.

The Gold Standard and the Bank of Canada

Like many countries, Canada adopted the gold standard in the 19th century. The Canadian dollar was pegged to a fixed amount of gold. However, the gold standard was abandoned during World War I due to the financial pressures of the war.

The Bank of Canada was established in 1934 as the country's central bank. One of its main roles was to manage the country's money supply and ensure the stability of the Canadian dollar. The Bank of Canada began issuing banknotes in 1935, replacing the notes issued by private banks.

The Bretton Woods System and the Floating Dollar

After World War II, Canada became a part of the Bretton Woods system, an international monetary system that pegged currencies to the US dollar, which was in turn pegged to gold. However, Canada was the first country to break from this system in 1950, choosing to let its currency float freely against other currencies.

The Canadian dollar has been a floating currency since then, with its value determined by the foreign exchange market. The value of the Canadian dollar has fluctuated over the years, influenced by factors such as oil prices, interest rates, and economic conditions.

The Loonie and the Toonie

The Canadian one-dollar coin, known as the Loonie, was introduced in 1987. The coin got its nickname from the image of a loon, a bird common in Canada, on its reverse side. The introduction of the Loonie was part of a move towards using coins for lower denominations, which are more durable and cost-effective than paper notes.

The two-dollar coin, known as the Toonie, was introduced in 1996. The Toonie features a polar bear on its reverse side, another iconic symbol of Canada.

Conclusion

The history of the Canadian dollar is a reflection of Canada's economic development and its place in the global economy. From the diverse currencies of the colonial period to the modern Loonie and Toonie, the Canadian dollar has evolved alongside the nation it serves. As Canada continues to navigate the global economic landscape, the journey of the Canadian dollar is sure to continue.