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USD/CAD sticks to intraday gains around 1.3525 amid weaker Crude Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair is seen building on last week's rebound from the 1.3440 support zone and gaining some positive traction for the second successive day on Monday. Spot prices stick to modest intraday gains through the first half of the European session and currently trade around the 1.3525 region amid weaker Crude Oil prices.FX Street2024-02-26

USD/CAD Price Analysis: Improves to near 1.3520 following February's high

USD/CAD moves higher for the second consecutive day, inching higher to near 1.3520 during the European session on Monday. The pair could meet the key barrier at the major level of 1.3550 following February's high at 1.3586.FX Street2024-02-26

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The Evolution of the Japanese Yen: A Historical Perspective

The Japanese yen, symbolized as JPY or ¥, is the official currency of Japan and a significant player in the global economy. Its history is a fascinating tale of economic development, strategic decision-making, and national identity. This article delves into the origins, development, and significant milestones of the Japanese yen.

The yen was introduced in 1871, during the Meiji era, as part of the modernization drive of the Japanese economy. Before this, Japan had a complex system of currency, with a variety of feudal domains issuing their own coins. The New Currency Act aimed to simplify and centralize this system, replacing it with a decimal-based currency, the yen. The yen was divided into 100 sen and 1000 rin, mirroring the European currency systems of the time.

The early yen was a gold standard currency, pegged to gold at a rate similar to that of the US dollar or the British pound. This was a strategic move to facilitate trade and integration with the global economy. However, the high value of the yen led to outflows of gold from Japan, causing economic instability.

In response to this, Japan abandoned the gold standard in 1931, following the trend set by the UK and the US during the Great Depression. The yen was devalued, and exchange controls were introduced to stabilize the economy. During World War II, the yen was further devalued, and the economy suffered from hyperinflation.

Post-war, the yen was pegged to the US dollar under the Bretton Woods system at a rate of 360 yen to 1 dollar. This fixed exchange rate system helped stabilize the Japanese economy and facilitated the country's post-war recovery and rapid economic growth. However, the Bretton Woods system collapsed in 1971, and the yen became a free-floating currency in 1973. This allowed the yen's value to be determined by the foreign exchange market, reflecting Japan's economic conditions more accurately.

The 1980s saw the yen strengthen significantly against the US dollar, a period known as the 'Endaka' or high-yen era. This was due to Japan's booming economy and large trade surpluses. However, the bubble burst in the early 1990s, leading to a period of economic stagnation known as the 'Lost Decade'.

In terms of physical currency, the yen has seen several changes. Coins come in denominations of 1, 5, 10, 50, 100, and 500 yen. The designs on these coins, featuring iconic symbols like the chrysanthemum and sakura blossoms, reflect Japan's rich cultural heritage. Banknotes come in denominations of 1000, 5000, and 10,000 yen, with a new series introduced in 2019 featuring prominent Japanese figures and cultural symbols.

The yen has also been influenced by significant economic events, such as the Asian Financial Crisis of 1997 and the Global Financial Crisis of 2008. These crises led to fluctuations in the value of the yen and prompted policy responses from the Bank of Japan.

Today, the Japanese yen is one of the most traded currencies in the world, reflecting Japan's significant role in the global economy. It serves not only as a medium of exchange within Japan but also as a safe-haven currency in times of global economic uncertainty.

In conclusion, the history of the Japanese yen is a testament to Japan's economic resilience and strategic adaptability. From its early days under the gold standard to its current status as a free-floating currency, the yen has continually evolved to meet the nation's needs. As we look to the future, it will undoubtedly continue to adapt and serve as a key player in the

The British Pound Sterling: A Journey Through History

The British Pound Sterling, often simply referred to as the pound, is the world's oldest currency still in use. Its rich history, spanning over 1,200 years, mirrors the economic, political, and social evolution of the United Kingdom.

The origins of the pound can be traced back to Anglo-Saxon England, around 775 AD. The pound was originally a unit of weight for silver and gold, and the term 'pound sterling' came from the old Norman term for a small star, or 'little star', which was used on early Norman silver pennies.

The pound as a currency unit was formally established in 928 AD during the reign of Athelstan, the first King of England, who introduced the silver penny, which was to become the fundamental unit of currency for the next 500 years. The system was based on the 'pound of sterling silver', which was divided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pennies.

The gold standard was adopted in Britain in 1816, which set the value of the pound as a specific amount of gold. This was a significant milestone in the history of the pound, as it provided a stable basis for international trade and helped to establish London as a global financial centre.

The Bank of England, established in 1694, began to issue paper money in the late 17th century. Initially, these were hand-written notes, but printed notes for £5 and upwards were introduced in 1759 due to gold shortages in the wake of the Seven Years War.

The 19th century saw significant changes in the British monetary system. The Coinage Act of 1816 set the value of the pound at 123.274 grains of gold, establishing the gold standard. The Bank Charter Act of 1844 gave the Bank of England the exclusive right to issue banknotes in England and Wales, a right it still holds today.

The outbreak of World War I led to the suspension of the gold standard in 1914, as the government needed to finance the war effort. The pound was devalued after the war, leading to economic instability and a period of high inflation.

The pound returned to the gold standard in 1925 but was forced off again in 1931 during the Great Depression. The Bretton Woods system was established in 1944, pegging the pound to the US dollar, which was convertible into gold. However, economic pressures led to the collapse of the Bretton Woods system in 1971, and the pound has been a free-floating currency since then.

Decimalisation occurred on 15th February 1971, a day known as Decimal Day. This replaced the old system of pounds, shillings, and pence with a new system dividing the pound into 100 new pence. This was a major change in the history of the pound, simplifying calculations and making transactions easier.

The late 20th and early 21st centuries have seen the pound weather numerous economic crises, including Black Wednesday in 1992 when the UK was forced to withdraw from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, and the global financial crisis of 2008. Despite these challenges, the pound has remained a key global reserve currency.

The design of British coins and banknotes has evolved over the centuries, reflecting the country's history and culture. The current series of banknotes, introduced between 2016 and 2020, features significant British figures from history, including Winston Churchill, Jane Austen, and JMW Turner.

In conclusion, the history of the British Pound Sterling is a fascinating journey through the economic and political history of the United Kingdom. From its origins in Anglo-Saxon England to its status as a major global currency today,the pound has played a central role in shaping the UK's economic destiny. Its resilience in the face of numerous challenges is a testament to the strength and adaptability of the UK's economy. As we look to the future, the pound will undoubtedly continue to evolve, reflecting the changing economic landscape of the UK and the wider world.