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USD/CAD sticks to intraday gains around 1.3525 amid weaker Crude Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair is seen building on last week's rebound from the 1.3440 support zone and gaining some positive traction for the second successive day on Monday. Spot prices stick to modest intraday gains through the first half of the European session and currently trade around the 1.3525 region amid weaker Crude Oil prices.FX Street2024-02-26

USD/CAD Price Analysis: Improves to near 1.3520 following February's high

USD/CAD moves higher for the second consecutive day, inching higher to near 1.3520 during the European session on Monday. The pair could meet the key barrier at the major level of 1.3550 following February's high at 1.3586.FX Street2024-02-26

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The British Pound Sterling: A Journey Through History

The British Pound Sterling, often simply referred to as the pound, is the world's oldest currency still in use. Its rich history, spanning over 1,200 years, mirrors the economic, political, and social evolution of the United Kingdom.

The origins of the pound can be traced back to Anglo-Saxon England, around 775 AD. The pound was originally a unit of weight for silver and gold, and the term 'pound sterling' came from the old Norman term for a small star, or 'little star', which was used on early Norman silver pennies.

The pound as a currency unit was formally established in 928 AD during the reign of Athelstan, the first King of England, who introduced the silver penny, which was to become the fundamental unit of currency for the next 500 years. The system was based on the 'pound of sterling silver', which was divided into 20 shillings, each of 12 pennies.

The gold standard was adopted in Britain in 1816, which set the value of the pound as a specific amount of gold. This was a significant milestone in the history of the pound, as it provided a stable basis for international trade and helped to establish London as a global financial centre.

The Bank of England, established in 1694, began to issue paper money in the late 17th century. Initially, these were hand-written notes, but printed notes for £5 and upwards were introduced in 1759 due to gold shortages in the wake of the Seven Years War.

The 19th century saw significant changes in the British monetary system. The Coinage Act of 1816 set the value of the pound at 123.274 grains of gold, establishing the gold standard. The Bank Charter Act of 1844 gave the Bank of England the exclusive right to issue banknotes in England and Wales, a right it still holds today.

The outbreak of World War I led to the suspension of the gold standard in 1914, as the government needed to finance the war effort. The pound was devalued after the war, leading to economic instability and a period of high inflation.

The pound returned to the gold standard in 1925 but was forced off again in 1931 during the Great Depression. The Bretton Woods system was established in 1944, pegging the pound to the US dollar, which was convertible into gold. However, economic pressures led to the collapse of the Bretton Woods system in 1971, and the pound has been a free-floating currency since then.

Decimalisation occurred on 15th February 1971, a day known as Decimal Day. This replaced the old system of pounds, shillings, and pence with a new system dividing the pound into 100 new pence. This was a major change in the history of the pound, simplifying calculations and making transactions easier.

The late 20th and early 21st centuries have seen the pound weather numerous economic crises, including Black Wednesday in 1992 when the UK was forced to withdraw from the European Exchange Rate Mechanism, and the global financial crisis of 2008. Despite these challenges, the pound has remained a key global reserve currency.

The design of British coins and banknotes has evolved over the centuries, reflecting the country's history and culture. The current series of banknotes, introduced between 2016 and 2020, features significant British figures from history, including Winston Churchill, Jane Austen, and JMW Turner.

In conclusion, the history of the British Pound Sterling is a fascinating journey through the economic and political history of the United Kingdom. From its origins in Anglo-Saxon England to its status as a major global currency today,the pound has played a central role in shaping the UK's economic destiny. Its resilience in the face of numerous challenges is a testament to the strength and adaptability of the UK's economy. As we look to the future, the pound will undoubtedly continue to evolve, reflecting the changing economic landscape of the UK and the wider world.

The Swiss Franc: A Historical Perspective

The Swiss Franc, often symbolized as CHF (Confoederatio Helvetica Franc), is the official currency of Switzerland and Liechtenstein. Its history is a fascinating journey that reflects the economic and political evolution of Switzerland, a country renowned for its stability and neutrality.

The Swiss Franc's story begins in the early 19th century. Before 1798, Switzerland was a loose confederation of cantons, each issuing its own currency. This system was chaotic, with over 860 different coins in circulation. The French invasion in 1798 brought about the Helvetic Republic, which attempted to introduce a standardized currency, the Swiss Franc, modeled after the French Franc. However, this was met with resistance, and the old system of cantonal currencies returned after the collapse of the Helvetic Republic in 1803.

The real turning point came in 1848 when the Swiss Federal Constitution came into effect, centralizing many powers previously held by the cantons, including the right to issue money. The Swiss Federal Assembly passed the Federal Coinage Act in 1850, establishing the Swiss Franc as the single official currency of Switzerland. The Swiss Franc was pegged to the French Franc at par, reflecting the close economic ties between the two countries.

The Swiss National Bank (SNB) was established in 1907, taking over the issuance of banknotes from private banks. The SNB's mandate was to ensure the stability of the Swiss Franc, a task it has performed admirably over the years. The Swiss Franc was initially on a gold standard, with 1 Franc equal to 0.290322 grams of gold. However, the gold standard was suspended during World War I, and Switzerland moved to a system of managed currency.

During the Bretton Woods era (1944-1971), the Swiss Franc was pegged to the U.S. Dollar, with a value of 4.375 Francs to the Dollar. However, Switzerland was not a signatory to the Bretton Woods Agreement, allowing it to avoid the currency instability that affected many other countries when the system collapsed in 1971.

Since the collapse of Bretton Woods, the Swiss Franc has been a free-floating currency. The SNB has occasionally intervened in the currency markets to prevent the Franc from appreciating too much, as Switzerland's economy is heavily dependent on exports. The Swiss Franc is often seen as a "safe haven" currency, attracting investors during times of global economic uncertainty.

In 1980, Switzerland began issuing coins made of cupronickel instead of silver, reflecting the rising cost of silver. The designs on Swiss coins have remained remarkably consistent since 1879, featuring the Swiss cross and the phrase "Confoederatio Helvetica", the Latin name for the Swiss Confederation.

In 2000, the SNB introduced a new series of banknotes, each featuring a famous Swiss personality. These were replaced in 2016 by the current series, which features abstract designs representing various aspects of Swiss society.

The Swiss Franc has been remarkably stable over its history, reflecting the stability of the Swiss economy and political system. This stability, combined with Switzerland's strong tradition of banking secrecy, has made the Swiss Franc a popular currency for international banking.

In conclusion, the history of the Swiss Franc is a testament to Switzerland's economic resilience and political stability. From its origins in the turbulent 19th century to its status as a "safe haven" currency in the 21st, the Swiss Franc has played a crucial role in Switzerland's economic success. As we look to the future, the Swiss Franc will undoubtedly continue to reflect the strengths and challenges of this unique Alpine nation.