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Today's Forex News

USD/CAD moves away from over two-month low, climbs beyond mid-1.3500s amid bearish Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair builds on the previous day's recovery move from the 1.3480 region, or its lowest level since September 29 and gains positive traction for the second successive day on Tuesday. The momentum lifts spot prices to a three-day top, beyond mid-1.3500s during the Asian session and is sponsored by bearish Crude Oil prices.FX Street2023-12-05

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil prices

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil pricesFX Street2023-12-05

USD/CAD moves away from over two-month low, climbs beyond mid-1.3500s amid bearish Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair builds on the previous day's recovery move from the 1.3480 region, or its lowest level since September 29 and gains positive traction for the second successive day on Tuesday. The momentum lifts spot prices to a three-day top, beyond mid-1.3500s during the Asian session and is sponsored by bearish Crude Oil prices.FX Street2023-12-05

EUR/USD, GBP/USD, USD/CAD, USD/JPY Forecasts – U.S. Dollar Tests New Highs As Rebound Continues

The disappointing JOLTs Job Openings report did not put pressure on the American currency.FXEmpire2023-12-05

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil prices

USD/CAD crawls beyond 1.3550 on risk aversion and lower oil pricesFX Street2023-12-05

USD/CAD moves away from over two-month low, climbs beyond mid-1.3500s amid bearish Oil prices

The USD/CAD pair builds on the previous day's recovery move from the 1.3480 region, or its lowest level since September 29 and gains positive traction for the second successive day on Tuesday. The momentum lifts spot prices to a three-day top, beyond mid-1.3500s during the Asian session and is sponsored by bearish Crude Oil prices.FX Street2023-12-05

Additional News:

The Canadian Dollar: A Historical Journey

The Canadian dollar, symbolized as CAD or C$, is the official currency of Canada. Its history is a fascinating tale of economic development, political decisions, and global influences. The journey of the Canadian dollar reflects the growth and evolution of Canada as a nation.

Early Currency in Canada

Before the introduction of the Canadian dollar, the region had a diverse array of currencies in circulation. French colonists used French coins, British colonists used British pounds, and Spanish dollars were also widely circulated. In addition, indigenous peoples used wampum, a form of currency made from shell beads.

In the early 19th century, the British pound was the official currency of British North America. However, the Spanish dollar was the most widely used currency in everyday transactions due to its wide circulation in the Americas.

The Birth of the Canadian Dollar

The idea of a unified currency for Canada was first proposed in the 1840s. The Province of Canada, consisting of modern-day Ontario and Quebec, passed the Currency Act in 1841, which aimed to replace the diverse currencies in circulation with a single, unified currency.

The Canadian dollar was officially introduced in 1858, replacing the British pound. The new currency was based on the decimal system, making it easier to calculate than the pound system. The Canadian dollar was pegged to the US dollar at par, reflecting the close economic ties between the two countries.

The Gold Standard and the Bank of Canada

Like many countries, Canada adopted the gold standard in the 19th century. The Canadian dollar was pegged to a fixed amount of gold. However, the gold standard was abandoned during World War I due to the financial pressures of the war.

The Bank of Canada was established in 1934 as the country's central bank. One of its main roles was to manage the country's money supply and ensure the stability of the Canadian dollar. The Bank of Canada began issuing banknotes in 1935, replacing the notes issued by private banks.

The Bretton Woods System and the Floating Dollar

After World War II, Canada became a part of the Bretton Woods system, an international monetary system that pegged currencies to the US dollar, which was in turn pegged to gold. However, Canada was the first country to break from this system in 1950, choosing to let its currency float freely against other currencies.

The Canadian dollar has been a floating currency since then, with its value determined by the foreign exchange market. The value of the Canadian dollar has fluctuated over the years, influenced by factors such as oil prices, interest rates, and economic conditions.

The Loonie and the Toonie

The Canadian one-dollar coin, known as the Loonie, was introduced in 1987. The coin got its nickname from the image of a loon, a bird common in Canada, on its reverse side. The introduction of the Loonie was part of a move towards using coins for lower denominations, which are more durable and cost-effective than paper notes.

The two-dollar coin, known as the Toonie, was introduced in 1996. The Toonie features a polar bear on its reverse side, another iconic symbol of Canada.

Conclusion

The history of the Canadian dollar is a reflection of Canada's economic development and its place in the global economy. From the diverse currencies of the colonial period to the modern Loonie and Toonie, the Canadian dollar has evolved alongside the nation it serves. As Canada continues to navigate the global economic landscape, the journey of the Canadian dollar is sure to continue.

Title: The Chinese Yuan: A Historical Overview

The Chinese Yuan, symbolized as CNY (¥), is the official currency of the People's Republic of China. Its history is deeply intertwined with the economic, political, and social evolution of China, one of the world's oldest civilizations and its second-largest economy.

The term "Yuan" dates back to the Mongol-led Yuan Dynasty (1271-1368), where it was used to refer to a round coin. However, the modern concept of the Chinese Yuan as a unit of currency began in the late 19th century.

During the late Qing Dynasty, China's traditional system of coinage, based on silver taels and copper-alloy cash coins, was increasingly challenged by the influx of foreign currencies brought by international trade. In response, the Qing government established the Shanghai Mint in 1896 and began issuing silver coins denominated in yuan, marking the first use of the yuan as a unit of account.

The 1911 revolution ended the Qing Dynasty and led to the establishment of the Republic of China. The new government aimed to modernize China's currency system and began issuing paper currency denominated in yuan. However, political instability led to a proliferation of different currencies issued by various regional banks and warlords.

The establishment of the People's Republic of China in 1949 marked a turning point in the history of the Chinese Yuan. The new communist government quickly moved to unify the currency system and established the People's Bank of China (PBOC) as the country's central bank. The PBOC began issuing a new currency, known as Renminbi (People's Currency), with the yuan as its primary unit.

The early years of the People's Republic were marked by economic instability and inflation, leading to several currency reforms. In 1955, a currency reform replaced the old yuan at a rate of one new yuan to 10,000 old yuan.

The Chinese economy was largely closed to the outside world until the economic reforms initiated by Deng Xiaoping in the late 1970s. These reforms marked the beginning of China's transformation into a market economy and led to significant changes in the management of the Chinese Yuan.

In 1994, a major reform unified the official and market exchange rates of the yuan, effectively devaluing the official rate and making the yuan more convertible under the current account. However, the yuan remained non-convertible under the capital account, with the government maintaining strict controls over capital flows.

The 21st century has seen the Chinese Yuan play an increasingly important role in the global economy, reflecting China's rising economic power. In 2005, China moved away from a fixed exchange rate system pegged to the U.S. dollar and adopted a managed float system based on market supply and demand with reference to a basket of currencies.

In 2010, China further loosened its capital controls, allowing greater use of the yuan in international trade and investment. This was part of a broader strategy to internationalize the yuan and reduce China's reliance on the U.S. dollar.

In 2016, the International Monetary Fund included the Chinese Yuan in its Special Drawing Rights basket, marking a significant milestone in the yuan's internationalization process.

Despite these reforms, the Chinese Yuan remains subject to capital controls, and its exchange rate is closely managed by the PBOC. This has led to tensions with trading partners, particularly the United States, which has accused China of manipulating its currency to gain a trade advantage.

In conclusion, the history of the Chinese Yuan reflects the broader economic and political history of China. From its origins in the late Qing Dynasty to its emerging role as a global currency, the Chinese Yuan embodies the economic transformations that have shaped modern China. As China continues to evolve, the Chinese Yuanwill undoubtedly continue to play a crucial role in the global economy, reflecting the strengths and challenges of this dynamic and rapidly changing nation.